New steering for the launch

We have been pretty happy with our Iain Oughtred designed launch, but now that we have sailed her for a couple of seasons we are trying to refine the few things we don’t like, or did not get right on the first go-round. One of those things was the tiller.

Initially I opted for a very traditional tiller. I liked the simplicity of the design and the classic look. However, what we found is that the traditional tiller had some traditional limitations due to how we use the boat. One has to do with sailing; if you are sailing the boat you need to push the tiller very far to port or starboard when tacking. This requires that the helmsman move his or her body all over the place just to tack the boat. This becomes even more problematic if you are single-handing because the excessive movement aft lifts the bow out of the water making the boat less able to windward.

The other issue has to do with taking passengers. The boat will comfortably hold five adults, except that anyone sitting aft has to deal with the sweep of the tiller and the dance of the helmsman.

None of this is totally unexpected, but it has become more annoying than we were prepared for.

What we ended up doing was to go back to the design source. 

Iain Oughtred has another design, the Caledonia Yawl, similar in size to the Penny Fee, with a push-pull tiller arrangement that frankly did not look that great to me on paper. However, I ran into a video of the tiller set up on Off Center Harbor and was totally swayed. I conceded (at least to my self) that it would not look as elegant and simple as the original tiller we had, but to my surprise, I found that the new design, while less classic, has a simple functionality that is also quite elegant.

Another advantage to the new system is that we made the tiller longer than the original so that if you are taking the boat out for a sail by yourself you can sit more forward, almost in the center of the boat which makes the boat balance beter.

It takes some getting used to and the instinct from long time sailors is still to move the tiller from side to side instead of fore and aft, but after taking it for a spin under sail and oar, I find that it is a really neat solution to our previous problems.

We had to come up with a way to lash the tiller when we leave the boat at the float, and that has not been a perfect solution, but we are working on it and that is a small wrinkle to work on.

Now I need to get back to work on the new sail. I am convinced that moving the center of effort aft, even a foot will create less drag in the rudder tacking and may gain us a few more degrees closer to the wind. We shall see.

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2 Responses to “New steering for the launch”

  1. Jeff Michals-Brown Says:

    Nice boat! Very elegant. Push-pull tiller is a good solution to the problems you describe.

    I don’t know the design, but I sat up and took notice at the idea of moving the ce aft so far. How does the rudder “drag” manifest itself? Does the boat have lee helm? Are you planning to move the ce by raking the mast? If you move the ce to correct lee helm, the distance you move it for a small boat is typically small. If, on the other hand, the drag is caused by needing to rudder more than (say) 3 degrees to hold the boat close to the wind, you have weather helm (the opposite problem) and need to move the ce forward by, for example reducing mast rake.

    • dovetails Says:

      Hi Jeff, The problem is that the foot of the sail is supposed to be two feet longer and was cut wrong by mistake. When reaching or even heading up the rudder is in trim, but the closer to the wind you get the more lee helm you get. The new sail matches the correct sail plan and will move the center of effort aft about a foot.

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