New Boat Part 17

Centerboard trunk and more on the interior details.

In our last exciting episode we were struggling with seat supports and gearing up for multiple coats of paint on the interior surfaces of the centerboard trunk. Since then we gave the interior of the centerboard trunk two coats of epoxy-paint-primer, three coats of topcoat, and three coats of antifouling paint. While we were painting we primed the sheer strake and the outwale of the boat and got the exterior of the boat ready for its final coats of paint.

Two halves of the centerboard trunk in foreground and the Penny Fee in the background

 

While paint drying we started to fit the blocking for the oarlocks. We had bought the actual oarlocks a year ago on sale, and now it was time fit them into the gunwales. Once they have been fitted we will leave them in place right up until the interior painting of the boat. They will be removed for this step and then will be bedded in marine bedding compound and permanently installed.

Blocking for oarlocks

Oarlock in place

With interior of the trunk painted we glued the two halves together and got the trunk ready for installation. The centerboard trunk, as is always the case in small boats of this nature, has taken a lot of time and work to complete, but this is also the part of the boat that is most likely to cause problems if it is not completed carefully.

Centerboard trunk glued together

Because of the placement of one of the floor timbers cut into the aft end of the centerboard trunk, and because the base of the trunk is the same width as the keelson, the alignment of the trunk during installation is easy. What is not easy is dealing with the squeeze-out of epoxy inside the trunk as it is secured. You see, you need to be able to get under the boat and reach up inside the centerboard slot to clean this out, and you can’t do that while the boat is sitting on the boat table. However,  when I decided to go with the table method of building the boat,  was aware that this issue would arise and my plan has to do with the fact that the tabletop is made using two pieces of plywood. The plan was to unscrew the two pieces from the frame and separate them leaving a space big enough to get under the boat and reach up and clean off the squeeze-out in the centerboard slot. This method worked pretty well and the process of shifting the boat made me again appreciate the lightness of the vessel.

Opening in the boat table

With centerboard trunk in place, we continued to work on the interior of the boat. The forward bulkhead with the framed opening for the hatch that will eventually go there was glued into place. We also measured out and cut the two seats that run crosswise in the boat. These were fairly easy projects.

Centerboard trunk in place

Rowing benches and fwd bulkhead

More difficult was the layout for the aft benches. The primary difficulty lay in trying to lay out the pieces of the aft benches so that we could get all of the pieces out of the Spanish Cedar bought for the purpose and not have a lot of waste or have to try and find more.

Starting on the aft benches

While the benches were being fitted I was also making adjustments to where the mast step and mast partners were located.

The Penny Fee plans come with an extraordinary number of options for the rig; lug sloop, lug yawl, gaff rig, gaff yawl—just not the rig we are looking for. All of these rigs have advantages. They are all beautiful, to my eye anyway, and I am sure they all sail well. They are, however, all more complicated than what we are looking for in a sailing launch for our Friendship Sloop.  What we want is something that we can set and strike with as little fuss as possible, has minimal spars, and those spars need to fit comfortably into the boat. After much thought (nearly two years) we have opted to go with our original instincts and chose the sprit rig.

The reasons for this are multiple and are rooted in simplicity. First, we have a loose-footed main. No boom means that the sail can be brailed up against the mast and the boat can be rowed without the need to strike the mast and sail. Second we get away with a mast and sprit that are the same length and shorter than the mast for the lug rig. Third, the sail area and shape of the sprit-sail is almost identical to the lug sloop rig which should result in very little change in performance. The center of effort of the sail is a little bit lower which should make the boat a little stiffer. The center of effort is also a few inches farther forward than on the lug sloop, we will correct for this by slightly adjusting the position of the mast step and partners. If you look at the drawings below; the first one is the lug sloop as drawn as part of the boat plans we bought. The second drawing shows the modification to the sprit rig. You can see yourself the differences and similarities.

Sail plan for the Penny Fee as a lug sloop

Our plan for the sprit rig for the Penny Fee

In essence we have changed little about sail area and placement, but have reduced the number of spars by one and the length of the remaining spars by at least a foot. Lastly, we have chosen a rig that has only three pieces of rigging, a sheet, a halyard, and a line called a snotter. Awesome.

If you would like to read all the posts related to this project together, go to the category at the right called “Penny Fee” and click on it. It will pull all the posts on the penny fee onto one page for you.

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One Response to “New Boat Part 17”

  1. timsboats Says:

    I’ve been enjoying following your build for a little while now. The Penny fee is a beautiful boat. One I’ve considered building myself but I’m not sure my skills are up to that level just yet. You’ve done a terrific job here with yours. Seeing it come together with paint and all the trimming is very exciting on this end. I can only imagine how you feel… Keep up the fine work – and enjoy.
    Tim

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